Dia de los Muertos

We talk often on this blog about how everyone’s grief journey is different. Since today is the Day of the Dead, we thought we would take the opportunity to show how people grieve differently in other cultures. Day of the Dead is filled with ritual that has been practiced for over 3,000 years in what is now Mexico.

A family honors their loved one during Dia de los Muertos

 

Dia de los Muertos is a festival where families celebrate the lives of loved ones who have died. Aztec culture viewed death as a continuation of life, so they embraced death as opposed to fearing it. “To them, life was a dream and only in death did they become truly awake.”

Sugar skulls are used as part of rituals during the celebration.

Today many wear masks, perform dances, decorate gravesites and prepare favorite foods on November 2 as part of this ancient tradition. The skull remains a significant symbol of the festival and is used to honor the dead. They are placed on altars, others are made of sugar – symbolizing death and rebirth.

To learn more about this festival and celebration life, watch the video below by Travel Channel.

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